SEC unveils suit against Ripple, calling XRP a ‘$1.3B unregistered securities offering’

The United States Securities and Exchange Commission has taken legal action against Ripple as well as its CEO, Brad Garlinghouse,and co-founder Christian Larsen.

In charges filed today in federal district court in Manhattan, the commission is alleging that the XRP token is classified as a security and is accusing Ripple and the two executives of raising more than $1.3 billion through an “unregistered, ongoing digital asset securities offering” to investors beginning in 2013. The SEC further alleges that Ripple distributed XRP for “labor and market-making services” and that Garlinghouse and Larsen failed to register their personal XRP sales, estimated at $600 million.

“[These actions] deprived potential purchasers of adequate disclosures about XRP and Ripple’s business and other important long-standing protections that are fundamental to our robust public market system,” said Stephanie Avakian, director of the SEC’s Enforcement Division.

Under SEC regulations, individuals and crypto firms must register their offerings with the commission or under an exemption if they qualify as securities. Which tokens qualify as securities, however, remains an extremely contentious subject. The crypto industry has been waiting for clarity from the SEC or new legislation on the subject for a long time.

Meanwhile, the SEC said that Garlinghouse and Larsen failed to register XRP when it served as an investment in Ripple and to enrich the pair personally. The firm and its two leaders could face disgorgement of their gains as well as civil penalties.

News of the coming SEC lawsuit broke yesterday, causing a steep drop in the price of XRP — at the time of publication, the token is valued at $0.45, having fallen more than 20% in the last week. Garlinghouse addressed the charges on Twitter, saying that the SEC “voted to attack crypto.”

“The SEC is doing the opposite of ‘fostering innovation’ here in the US,” said Garlinghouse, referencing the commission’s FinHub

Read More